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06/01/2010

U.S. Senate Brawl Gets Nastier

  With just over five months to go before the November election, the campaign back-and-forth in the U.S. Senate race would indicate that Illinois voters who would select from the major parties have the following choice:

   A lyin', two-faced "Washington insider" or a "failed mob banker".

   Such is the state of the race between republican Mark Kirk and democrat Alexi Giannoulias.  Its only June and the campaign rhetoric sounds like the political version of one of those Ultimate Fighting matches where virtually anything goes.  If its this bad now, can you imagine what they'll say about each other after Labor Day? 

  Kirk, who called his admitted 2003 misidentification of a past military award a "discrepancy", responded to his critics by going right back to bashing Giannoulias for the failure of the democrat's family-owned Broadway Bank in April.  The "failed mob banker" description of Giannoulias refers to questionable loans the bank made over the years to convicted felons.

  But the Giannoulias campaign counter-charges that Kirk continued to use the "discrepancy" seven years later in an internet campaign video posted on YouTube this year after the 2010 primary.  And Kirk used the tag line "I'm Mark Kirk and I approved this message" at the end of the two minute piece.   The republican's campaign pulled the video after the Washington Post broke the "Intelligence Officer of the Year" story last weekend.  But we obtained a copy for you to see at the link below.

https://www.youtube.com/user/campaigntvads#p/search/3/2bKcmbi_sT8

  There's a saying that goes "tell a lie often enough and you'll begin to believe it".  Is that why Kirk was still repeating the "discrepancy" seven years later?

 If the punches and counterpunches continue at this intensity until the vote next fall, both candidates could suffer career-defining political damage that could last beyond election day, win or lose.




 

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